Footstool

Elevate those plates of meat whenever possible, hopefully, preventing you from getting into Barney Rubble.

Let me explain …

A number of years ago, we met someone from the U.K., who explained how Cockney Rhyming Slang worked. Basically, it has to do with words that rhyme with the actual word that you want to say. Originating in Victorian England, it’s uncertain whether it was intentionally used to hide its meaning from the law or outsiders, but users have to be knowledgeable about the references made within the rhyme.

I don’t want you to get you into trouble with your feet, so I’ll remind you that a footstool is an important piece of furniture to have, whether it be at work or at home. Elevate those feet when you need an apéritf*.

(*That last one was my version of Rhyming Slang: relief.)

Santa has outsourced his work to a certain workshop found right here, in British Columbia. If you’re looking for a custom-built footstool, such as the one Santa has under his desk, please check out Maarten Meerman’s site, Nanotray, for all things wooden, practical or whimsical.

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6 Responses to “Footstool”

  1. I have one under my desk! (with the legs taken off for better height).

    An old phonebook (or two taped together) also works.

    Was told the hieght should be so your knees are slightly higher than your hips to relieve stress on your back.

    • I like the phone book idea – that reminds me of something I saw in a home magazine about using a bunch of magazines to make a footstool.

      Good point re. the hips, but not always practical when working at a desk.

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