Posts tagged ‘beach’

August 24, 2017

#532 – What to Do at the Beach When You Have RA #4

BeachZone

Put away your phone. Put down your book. Stop chatting.

For the next few minutes get into the zone. Let yourself be transported by the grace of nature into a place that resonates with the beat of your heart.

To do:

  1. Go to your favourite beach.
  2. Get comfy, either on the sand, a chair, the dock or a log.
  3. Pause.
  4. Exhale slowly to the count of 5 or 6.
  5. Inhale slowly to the count of 5 or 6.
  6. Establish a nice smooth rhythm which you will continue for Steps 7 to 10.
  7. Gently shift your attention to your hearing. Notice the symphony of sounds such as the water lapping along the shore, the wind whistling in your ears, the birds singing, etc.
  8. Next, pay attention to what you see. Nature has provided a living landscape for you to enjoy. Notice the colours, the light, the patterns, etc.
  9. Finally, notice your breath. How do you feel? Is there any tightness anywhere? What does the sand feel like under your feet? How does it feel when the sun kisses your skin? Perhaps your feet are being massaged by the water at the shore – what does that feel like? Has your mind quieted down? Do you feel more peaceful?
  10. Repeat often.

 

 

 

 

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August 17, 2017

#531 – What to Do at the Beach When You Have RA #3

laddergolf

I’d heard about it, but until this summer, never had the opportunity to play Ladder Golf. It’s an easy, fun way to build some movement in those lazy, hazy days of summer.

The game is simple and gentle enough that it can be played with arthritic joints. In the photo, you can see me toss the red bolas (2 golf balls attached to either end of a rope), towards the ladder at the other end of our playing area.

If you’re game to play, I’m ready.

For the rules, check out Ladder Golf.

August 3, 2017

#530 – What to Do at the Beach When You Have RA #2

Maybe you don’t like to be in the water (gasp!), but you can be on the water. You may want to give kayaking a go. If the sit-in kayaks are too difficult for you, you may wish to try the sit-on type, like I recently did.

2kayaks

Ready for a paddle?

Initially, I had help lowering me down onto the kayak, then being pushed away from the shore. I discovered that I could do it myself by pushing the kayak into thigh-deep water. I then sat on the edge and reached for the far side with one hand, while pivoting onto the seat. Yes, I did get a wet bum, but then, that’s part of the fun.

I noticed a change with a few days of paddling. My shorts were looser in the waist and I felt stronger throughout my trunk. I wan’t doing hours of paddling either. I’d consider buying one if I didn’t have to put it on the rough in order to transport it. That’s beyond my capabilities. I need to win that lottery (I rarely buy tickets for), in order to have beach-front property! *Dreaming*

Which brings me to an important stress addressing tip. Recall the feelings you had while doing experiences you love (like kayaking on a beautiful lake), in order to bring about a change in your stress level. Notice what happens while you relive your joy/excitement/love. (I offer coaching to help you dive deeper into the techniques.)

kayaking1
Chico makes a fine mast-head, don’t you think?

 

Kayaking doesn’t have to be a solitary activity. My sister and I enjoyed a few “Race you!” times, as well, as just some float-and-chat times. A fine combination, indeed.

Barbieme

Sister-time!

As always, stay safe. Know your limits and capabilities. Watch the weather.

July 24, 2017

#528 – What to Do at the Beach When You Have RA #1

LoonLake

You know I’m going to say it, don’t you? The most obvious thing, for me, and hopefully for you, too, is to swim.

If you haven’t started swimming, I enthusiastically encourage you to start. Swimming is an excellent, comprehensive form of exercise, regardless of whether you have RA or not!

When I first began swimming in earnest at the age of 14, by enrolling in a competitive swim club, little did I know that this would be the one exercise that has carried me through the decades of flares, surgeries and pain.

When you are so sore and stiff and feel less than fluid in your movements, the weightless you experience in the water gives you back that all-important sensation of mobility. If your reason for not going in the water is because you are cold, pick up the pace and focus on the exercises and movements, as opposed to how cold you feel. You’ll soon warm up. Dependent upon your degree of comfort and skills in the water, you can work on endurance, flexibility, mobility, range of motion and strength. Don’t forget to simply float at the end and rejoice in that feeling of letting-go.

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